IPCC: Crop yields to decline by 2% per decade

From BBC News, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) will soon publish a new report on the anticipated effects of climate change over the next century. In an initial draft of the report, the IPCC states that we can expect world crop yields to decline by up to 2% per decade for the rest of the century.

A leaked draft of the summary, seen by the BBC, points to a range of negative effects that will, in some instances, be “irreversible”.

Millions of people living in coastal areas in Asia will be affected by flooding, and displaced due to land loss.

The draft says that crop yields around the world will decline by up to 2% per decade for the rest of the century.

If the world warms by 4C towards the end of this century, this will pose a “significant risk to food security even with adaptation”.

The summary says that in the near term, at levels of warming that scientists say we are already committed to, there is a very high risk to Arctic sea ice and coral reefs.

They warn that the oceans will become more acidic as they warm, and species will move towards the poles to escape the heat.

Last Thursday, super-famous (hey, at least in our world) environmental economist Richard Carson came and gave a lecture on the evolution of economic thought on climate change. One thing he pointed out was that most current climate change prediction models look at effects on agriculture in a still relatively broad manner and that there is a great need for analyses that are more crop-specific and region-specific.