Weed of the Week: Carolina Geranium

Authors: Jed McCoy, Doug Martin, Jordan Billingsley

What is Carolina Geranium?

Carolina Geranium (Geranium carolinianum) is a member of the Geranium family (Geraniaceae).  It is a native, broadleaf winter annual. One will typically find Carolina Geranium in poor soils and near dry areas; mainly landscape beds and thinner turf areas. This weed has been used medicinally as well. Mainly, it has been used to stop bleeding and sooth sore throats when crushed.North Farm Greenhouse Blog-

What does it look like?

Carolina Geranium is a diffusely branched weed standing about 1” tall.  This geranium has long petiole stems that are often pink to reddish with hairy stems that flow into a finely divided palmate leaf. The flower also had a little inconspicuous pink bud.  This weed is most commonly identified by its “stork’s-bill” seed head. It is a long, hairy, pointed head that will produce multiple seeds that contain hard seed coats.

Flower Blog

Stork's Bill Blog-

How do I control it?

Carolina Geranium is a tough weed to control. Not only does the seed have a hard-coated membrane, which can withstand prolonged dormancy in the ground, but it also is hard to control with herbicides once established. Cultural practices include frequent mowing and hand pulling, while herbicide options include metsulfuron and trifloxysulfuron-sodium .

2 thoughts on “Weed of the Week: Carolina Geranium

  1. Pingback: Turf Tips - May 31, 2013 - News and Updates

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